Cinematic Horoscopes: Scorpio Season

By: Daisy Stackpole

We feature twelve films each month that relate to the twelve zodiac signs, accompanied by lighthearted astrological advice.

  Scorpio:       A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night       (2014) directed by Ana Lily Amirpour   Hi Scorpio Squad, it’s finally our time! Sorry, other signs, but I clearly have an affinity for this spooky and sexy season, and I hope you do too! Scorpio is a complex and powerful sign that is all about intimacy, emotion, power, the mysterious and metaphysical, loyalty, and passion. We are driven, and when we support something or someone, it generally leads to success. For our film this Scorpio season, I have selected the gorgeous and gloomy  A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night  by auteur Ana Lily Amirpour, an Iranian black-and-white vampire Western romance. It’s a film as brooding, tender, and layered as our Scorpio hearts. Set in the fictional “Bad City”, mostly at night, when its inhabitants partake in a variety of vices, the film centers on Arash (Arash Marandi), a convincing Iranian James Dean, and The Girl (Sheila Vand), a cloaked nightcrawler with a taste for blood. Amidst the corruption and heartbreak that looms over Bad City, Arash and The Girl begin to fall in love, when Arash isn’t caring for his addict father and The Girl isn’t vengefully killing the toxic men that surround her. Scorpios will appreciate the beauty of the film, the palpable lust, and romance, the macabre tone, and the themes of loyalty and revenge. Watch this film and ponder upon your own power and enigmatic nature. Are you using your connection to the divine to the best of your abilities?

Scorpio: A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (2014) directed by Ana Lily Amirpour

Hi Scorpio Squad, it’s finally our time! Sorry, other signs, but I clearly have an affinity for this spooky and sexy season, and I hope you do too! Scorpio is a complex and powerful sign that is all about intimacy, emotion, power, the mysterious and metaphysical, loyalty, and passion. We are driven, and when we support something or someone, it generally leads to success. For our film this Scorpio season, I have selected the gorgeous and gloomy A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night by auteur Ana Lily Amirpour, an Iranian black-and-white vampire Western romance. It’s a film as brooding, tender, and layered as our Scorpio hearts. Set in the fictional “Bad City”, mostly at night, when its inhabitants partake in a variety of vices, the film centers on Arash (Arash Marandi), a convincing Iranian James Dean, and The Girl (Sheila Vand), a cloaked nightcrawler with a taste for blood. Amidst the corruption and heartbreak that looms over Bad City, Arash and The Girl begin to fall in love, when Arash isn’t caring for his addict father and The Girl isn’t vengefully killing the toxic men that surround her. Scorpios will appreciate the beauty of the film, the palpable lust, and romance, the macabre tone, and the themes of loyalty and revenge. Watch this film and ponder upon your own power and enigmatic nature. Are you using your connection to the divine to the best of your abilities?


  Sagittarius:       Vagabond     (1985) directed by Agnes Varda   Sagittarius, as the free spirits of the zodiac, you are more than likely the friend who will take off on a dime for a whirlwind vacation and has a Pinterest board full of #vanlife inspiration pics. It can be impossible to pin a Sagittarius down; wanderlust is at the heart of your sign, and that certainly can serve you well. However, I have selected a cautionary tale of sorts for your film this month.  Vagabond  is a beautiful film directed by none other than the queen of the French New Wave, Agnes Varda. A later film for Varda, she hones her impeccable craft to tell the story of Mona (Sandrine Bonnaire), a young wanderer walking across the chilly French wine country in Winter. Over time, the viewer learns that Mona was not always living a nomadic existence, she once worked at an office in Paris and lived comfortably financially, but was deeply dissatisfied with her capitalistic life. So, she decided to leave all responsibility behind and wander, meeting other souls along the way, including a Dendrology Professor (Macha Meril) and a maid (Yolande Moreau). I won’t give away the conceit of the film, though it is revealed early on, but I urge you, Sagittarius, to use this film as a spark to think about your own fear of being tied down. Are you a free spirit or are you scared to give too much of yourself to one place or group of people? Is it time to plant some serious roots?

Sagittarius: Vagabond (1985) directed by Agnes Varda

Sagittarius, as the free spirits of the zodiac, you are more than likely the friend who will take off on a dime for a whirlwind vacation and has a Pinterest board full of #vanlife inspiration pics. It can be impossible to pin a Sagittarius down; wanderlust is at the heart of your sign, and that certainly can serve you well. However, I have selected a cautionary tale of sorts for your film this month. Vagabond is a beautiful film directed by none other than the queen of the French New Wave, Agnes Varda. A later film for Varda, she hones her impeccable craft to tell the story of Mona (Sandrine Bonnaire), a young wanderer walking across the chilly French wine country in Winter. Over time, the viewer learns that Mona was not always living a nomadic existence, she once worked at an office in Paris and lived comfortably financially, but was deeply dissatisfied with her capitalistic life. So, she decided to leave all responsibility behind and wander, meeting other souls along the way, including a Dendrology Professor (Macha Meril) and a maid (Yolande Moreau). I won’t give away the conceit of the film, though it is revealed early on, but I urge you, Sagittarius, to use this film as a spark to think about your own fear of being tied down. Are you a free spirit or are you scared to give too much of yourself to one place or group of people? Is it time to plant some serious roots?


  Capricorn:     Babette’s Feast     (1987) directed by Gabriel Axel   Capricorn, as we’ve mentioned before, work is at the heart of your sign. You are tireless workers who gain a sense of place in the world through your career. You are also fiercely intelligent and detail-oriented, which makes for an even better employee. You will relate to many facets of the gorgeous Danish film,  Babette’s Feast , a film that fits within one of my favorite cinematic canons: 80’s Baroque-inspired films, like  Amadeus ,  The Draughtsman's Contract , and  Dangerous Liaisons . However, where those films are abundant, corporal, and borderline gauche,  Babette’s Feast  uses similar imagery while adopting a more understated and intimate tone. The film takes place on a small island village off the coast of Denmark, inhabited by devout Protestants, two of which are sisters, Martine (Birgitte Federspiel) and Philippa (Bodil Kjer). These sisters provide the community with a sense of luminosity, vivacity, and beauty. They are both pursued by enchanting suitors, but their strict father forbids them to marry. Decades later, the sisters still live on the island after the death of their father and employ an enigmatic French woman, Babette (Stephane Audran), as their housekeeper. While trepidatious of an outsider at first, the community on the island soon comes to admire Babette’s spirit, and the townspeople slowly relinquish their judgments and conditioning that one must always be working and remain stoic to the point of suppressing emotions. The film culminates in a grand French feast, prepared by Babette after coming into some funds. Here, the pious townspeople must choose between indulgence and emotion and stoic self-deprivation. Capricorn, I encourage you to watch this film and decide for yourself if you are withholding yourself from pleasures and emotions in favor of bottling everything up and keeping your head down. It is within the balance of pain and pleasure, work and play, that we truly live and thrive.

Capricorn: Babette’s Feast (1987) directed by Gabriel Axel

Capricorn, as we’ve mentioned before, work is at the heart of your sign. You are tireless workers who gain a sense of place in the world through your career. You are also fiercely intelligent and detail-oriented, which makes for an even better employee. You will relate to many facets of the gorgeous Danish film, Babette’s Feast, a film that fits within one of my favorite cinematic canons: 80’s Baroque-inspired films, like Amadeus, The Draughtsman's Contract, and Dangerous Liaisons. However, where those films are abundant, corporal, and borderline gauche, Babette’s Feast uses similar imagery while adopting a more understated and intimate tone. The film takes place on a small island village off the coast of Denmark, inhabited by devout Protestants, two of which are sisters, Martine (Birgitte Federspiel) and Philippa (Bodil Kjer). These sisters provide the community with a sense of luminosity, vivacity, and beauty. They are both pursued by enchanting suitors, but their strict father forbids them to marry. Decades later, the sisters still live on the island after the death of their father and employ an enigmatic French woman, Babette (Stephane Audran), as their housekeeper. While trepidatious of an outsider at first, the community on the island soon comes to admire Babette’s spirit, and the townspeople slowly relinquish their judgments and conditioning that one must always be working and remain stoic to the point of suppressing emotions. The film culminates in a grand French feast, prepared by Babette after coming into some funds. Here, the pious townspeople must choose between indulgence and emotion and stoic self-deprivation. Capricorn, I encourage you to watch this film and decide for yourself if you are withholding yourself from pleasures and emotions in favor of bottling everything up and keeping your head down. It is within the balance of pain and pleasure, work and play, that we truly live and thrive.


  Aquarius:     Queen of Katwe     (2016) directed by Mira Nair   Aquarius, you are a natural born leader and it should come at no surprise that so many politicians and world leaders are fellow Aquarians! Never interested in brute force, you are the philosopher kings of the zodiac, allowing your incredible intellect and curiosity to guide your leadership tactics. This month I’ve gone in a different director for you, selecting a sweet underdog story that can feel a bit pandering at times, but there is a great lesson for you in it, Aquarius. Directed by Mira Nair,  Queen of Katwe  tells the true story of Phiona Mutesi (Madina Nalwanga), a bright young girl living in Katwe, a Ugandan slum, with her mother, Nakku Harriet (Lupita Nyong’o). Their family is impoverished and Phiona finds it difficult to help raise money for her siblings and mother, until one day she encounters a man named Robert (David Oyelowo), who teachers children soccer and chess. Phiona possesses a strong talent for chess and spends an increasing amount of time under Robert’s tutelage until she is ready to compete in chess tournaments. In these tournaments, Phiona learns to trust herself, her mind, and ultimately defines her own rules for success. Aquarius, take a note from Anna’s book and take it easy on your inevitable path to power and self-possession. Remind yourself along the way that there is no linear path to greatness, for what is greatness for you might not apply to everyone, and you wouldn’t have it any other way.

Aquarius: Queen of Katwe (2016) directed by Mira Nair

Aquarius, you are a natural born leader and it should come at no surprise that so many politicians and world leaders are fellow Aquarians! Never interested in brute force, you are the philosopher kings of the zodiac, allowing your incredible intellect and curiosity to guide your leadership tactics. This month I’ve gone in a different director for you, selecting a sweet underdog story that can feel a bit pandering at times, but there is a great lesson for you in it, Aquarius. Directed by Mira Nair, Queen of Katwe tells the true story of Phiona Mutesi (Madina Nalwanga), a bright young girl living in Katwe, a Ugandan slum, with her mother, Nakku Harriet (Lupita Nyong’o). Their family is impoverished and Phiona finds it difficult to help raise money for her siblings and mother, until one day she encounters a man named Robert (David Oyelowo), who teachers children soccer and chess. Phiona possesses a strong talent for chess and spends an increasing amount of time under Robert’s tutelage until she is ready to compete in chess tournaments. In these tournaments, Phiona learns to trust herself, her mind, and ultimately defines her own rules for success. Aquarius, take a note from Anna’s book and take it easy on your inevitable path to power and self-possession. Remind yourself along the way that there is no linear path to greatness, for what is greatness for you might not apply to everyone, and you wouldn’t have it any other way.


  Pisces:     Clouds of Sils Maria       (2014) directed by Olivier Assayas   Pisces, you are an eternal spring of optimism, creativity, and empathy. You understand humanity and art on a deep level that few others can comprehend. Many Pisces fit in comfortably in creative fields, such as filmmaking, music, and visual arts. For this reason, your film this month is the gorgeous and heartbreaking  Clouds of Sils Maria . Carried with astonishing grace and elegance by Juliette Binoche, Kristen Stewart, and Chloe Grace Moretz, the film chronicles the oft intersecting themes of fame, aging, lust, intimacy, and power. The film relies heavily on imagery and the relationships between Binoche’s Maria, a respected actress who is considered past her prime, Stewart’s Valentine, Maria’s assertive and emotionally supportive assistant, and Moretz’s Jo-Ann, a young American actress with a penchant for controversy. The crux of the narrative revolves around Maria being cast in a remake of the film that launched her career, about an older woman, Helene, who falls madly in love with a young free-spirited girl, Sigrid, which eventually leads Helene to suicide. Now, Maria must decide if she is prepared to reverse roles and take on the part of Helene. Pisces, you will be fascinated by the complex and constantly shifting relationships, stunning aesthetics, and study of art and fame present in this film. Allow yourself to contemplate your own creative endeavors and your own relationship to age and vanity. You will appreciate the slow tempo of this film as you reflect on your own experiences while taking in the haunting beauty of  Clouds of Sils Maria .

Pisces: Clouds of Sils Maria (2014) directed by Olivier Assayas

Pisces, you are an eternal spring of optimism, creativity, and empathy. You understand humanity and art on a deep level that few others can comprehend. Many Pisces fit in comfortably in creative fields, such as filmmaking, music, and visual arts. For this reason, your film this month is the gorgeous and heartbreaking Clouds of Sils Maria. Carried with astonishing grace and elegance by Juliette Binoche, Kristen Stewart, and Chloe Grace Moretz, the film chronicles the oft intersecting themes of fame, aging, lust, intimacy, and power. The film relies heavily on imagery and the relationships between Binoche’s Maria, a respected actress who is considered past her prime, Stewart’s Valentine, Maria’s assertive and emotionally supportive assistant, and Moretz’s Jo-Ann, a young American actress with a penchant for controversy. The crux of the narrative revolves around Maria being cast in a remake of the film that launched her career, about an older woman, Helene, who falls madly in love with a young free-spirited girl, Sigrid, which eventually leads Helene to suicide. Now, Maria must decide if she is prepared to reverse roles and take on the part of Helene. Pisces, you will be fascinated by the complex and constantly shifting relationships, stunning aesthetics, and study of art and fame present in this film. Allow yourself to contemplate your own creative endeavors and your own relationship to age and vanity. You will appreciate the slow tempo of this film as you reflect on your own experiences while taking in the haunting beauty of Clouds of Sils Maria.


  Aries:       White Material     (2009) directed by Claire Denis   Aries, as the first sign of the zodiac, you tend to be head-strong and adamant in your beliefs and opinions. As you also have a strong sense of intuition, most of the time these qualities serve you well. However, as with any sign, your weaknesses can occasionally get you into trouble. This month, I invite to take a step back and reflect on your tendency to think you’re right. To aid you in this journey, I recommend Claire Denis’ stunning film  White Material,  helmed by the incomparable screen presence of Isabelle Huppert as Maria, a French coffee farmer in an unnamed African country embroiled in political unrest and bloodshed. In spite of the violence and uncertainty around her and the fact that Maria’s coffee crop is fruitless and plummeting her deeper into financial ruin, Maria’s pride causes her to remain on her plantation and continue to live the way she has grown accustomed to. A modern-day allegory for colonialism, white fragility, and the complicated status white women move through the world with,  White Material  is a film that lingers with you long after the credits roll. Aries, you will feel a connection to Maria’s determination and impenetrable will, but upon contemplation, you will also realize her determination is misplaced and baseless. Give yourself a reality check and make sure all of your efforts are being put towards causes that deserve them, Aries, you are an incredibly powerful sign with many cosmic gifts when used wisely.

Aries: White Material (2009) directed by Claire Denis

Aries, as the first sign of the zodiac, you tend to be head-strong and adamant in your beliefs and opinions. As you also have a strong sense of intuition, most of the time these qualities serve you well. However, as with any sign, your weaknesses can occasionally get you into trouble. This month, I invite to take a step back and reflect on your tendency to think you’re right. To aid you in this journey, I recommend Claire Denis’ stunning film White Material, helmed by the incomparable screen presence of Isabelle Huppert as Maria, a French coffee farmer in an unnamed African country embroiled in political unrest and bloodshed. In spite of the violence and uncertainty around her and the fact that Maria’s coffee crop is fruitless and plummeting her deeper into financial ruin, Maria’s pride causes her to remain on her plantation and continue to live the way she has grown accustomed to. A modern-day allegory for colonialism, white fragility, and the complicated status white women move through the world with, White Material is a film that lingers with you long after the credits roll. Aries, you will feel a connection to Maria’s determination and impenetrable will, but upon contemplation, you will also realize her determination is misplaced and baseless. Give yourself a reality check and make sure all of your efforts are being put towards causes that deserve them, Aries, you are an incredibly powerful sign with many cosmic gifts when used wisely.



  Taurus:     Wendy and Lucy     (2008) directed by Kelly Reichardt   Taurus, not unlike Aries, you are a sign known for being stubborn and confusing at times. At the same time, you are deeply caring friends and loyal to the ones you choose to let into your world. At times, these qualities can become at odds with one another, ending in Taurus making choices that compromise their own well-being for the sake of being devoted to another. An interesting look into this phenomena is Kelly Reichardt’s delicate yet powerful  Wendy and Lucy.  A true character study, the film follows Wendy (in a career-high performance from Michelle Williams), an aimless young woman who has landed somewhat confusingly in Alaska, with nothing to her name except a few dollars, a ramshackle car, and her sweet dog and best friend, Lucy. Wendy has little to no regard for society’s rules and expectations of her, and after shoplifting dog food to feed Lucy, Wendy is arrested and taken to jail. When she is released, she discovers, to her horror, that Lucy is no longer tied to the post outside the grocery store she stole from. I will purposefully leave the story there, but Taurus, I hope you will use this film as a tool to ruminate upon your own behaviors in relationships, and if they are truly serving you and those around you.

Taurus: Wendy and Lucy (2008) directed by Kelly Reichardt

Taurus, not unlike Aries, you are a sign known for being stubborn and confusing at times. At the same time, you are deeply caring friends and loyal to the ones you choose to let into your world. At times, these qualities can become at odds with one another, ending in Taurus making choices that compromise their own well-being for the sake of being devoted to another. An interesting look into this phenomena is Kelly Reichardt’s delicate yet powerful Wendy and Lucy. A true character study, the film follows Wendy (in a career-high performance from Michelle Williams), an aimless young woman who has landed somewhat confusingly in Alaska, with nothing to her name except a few dollars, a ramshackle car, and her sweet dog and best friend, Lucy. Wendy has little to no regard for society’s rules and expectations of her, and after shoplifting dog food to feed Lucy, Wendy is arrested and taken to jail. When she is released, she discovers, to her horror, that Lucy is no longer tied to the post outside the grocery store she stole from. I will purposefully leave the story there, but Taurus, I hope you will use this film as a tool to ruminate upon your own behaviors in relationships, and if they are truly serving you and those around you.


  Gemini:     Desperately Seeking Susan     (1985) directed by Susan Seidelman   Geminis, as we’ve touched on before, the basis of your sign is a profound sense of duality. To the unempathetic, this can seem like a sense of two-facedness, but in reality, you contain multitudes and tend to be a less judgemental and dogmatic person than other signs. In addition to being intensely curious and intelligent, Geminis are known for their keen wit and sense of humor. Therefore, the perfect film for you this month is  Desperately Seeking Susan , Susan Seidelman’s deliciously fun and funny tale of mistaken identity. Passed off as a fluff film at the time (by male critics), this film is actually a masterfully directed examination of class, societal expectations, bodily autonomy, and the notion of destiny. The film centers around Roberta (the lovely Rosanna Arquette), a New Jersey housewife with a burning sense of ennui for another life, and Susan (Madonna at her finest), a rebellious bohemian with a rockstar boyfriend and killer wardrobe. Susan’s suitor routinely writes personal ads to her in the newspaper, instructing her when and where they can rendezvous (wow, pre-cell phone dating was wild, huh?). Roberta comes across these ads amid the painful banality of her life and uses them as a means for escapism into the life she wants; one full of spontaneity and passion. One day, Roberta follows her casual voyeurism into reality and goes to the meet-up spot of Susan and her boyfriend. From here, a series of factors involving amnesia and a mix-up at a vintage store lead to pandemonium as Roberta temporarily becomes Susan. I won’t divulge any more, as this film is truly a blast to watch, and I highly encourage you to gather your friends, pizza, and martinis and have a very fun movie night. Geminis, you get enough flack from everyone that I don’t think I’ll give you any advice this month. Simply enjoy  Desperately Seeking Susan  and embrace your inner Gemini.

Gemini: Desperately Seeking Susan (1985) directed by Susan Seidelman

Geminis, as we’ve touched on before, the basis of your sign is a profound sense of duality. To the unempathetic, this can seem like a sense of two-facedness, but in reality, you contain multitudes and tend to be a less judgemental and dogmatic person than other signs. In addition to being intensely curious and intelligent, Geminis are known for their keen wit and sense of humor. Therefore, the perfect film for you this month is Desperately Seeking Susan, Susan Seidelman’s deliciously fun and funny tale of mistaken identity. Passed off as a fluff film at the time (by male critics), this film is actually a masterfully directed examination of class, societal expectations, bodily autonomy, and the notion of destiny. The film centers around Roberta (the lovely Rosanna Arquette), a New Jersey housewife with a burning sense of ennui for another life, and Susan (Madonna at her finest), a rebellious bohemian with a rockstar boyfriend and killer wardrobe. Susan’s suitor routinely writes personal ads to her in the newspaper, instructing her when and where they can rendezvous (wow, pre-cell phone dating was wild, huh?). Roberta comes across these ads amid the painful banality of her life and uses them as a means for escapism into the life she wants; one full of spontaneity and passion. One day, Roberta follows her casual voyeurism into reality and goes to the meet-up spot of Susan and her boyfriend. From here, a series of factors involving amnesia and a mix-up at a vintage store lead to pandemonium as Roberta temporarily becomes Susan. I won’t divulge any more, as this film is truly a blast to watch, and I highly encourage you to gather your friends, pizza, and martinis and have a very fun movie night. Geminis, you get enough flack from everyone that I don’t think I’ll give you any advice this month. Simply enjoy Desperately Seeking Susan and embrace your inner Gemini.


  Cancer:     Tampopo     (1985) directed by Juzo Itami   Cancer, as the “mother sign” of the zodiac, family is a very central piece of your life. However, it’s 2018 and our concept of family has thankfully evolved from something very fixed to something more amorphous and inclusive. Many people now refer to their friends and mentors as their, “chosen family”, and for many folks, a chosen family is every bit as important, if not more important, than blood relatives. With the holidays coming up, a time that I know can be difficult for many without a healthy biological family dynamic, I chose a film for you that beautifully showcases the strength in a chosen family.  Tampopo  is an incredibly visually stimulating film telling the story of a down-on-her-luck ramen shop owner, Tampopo (Nobuko Miyamoto), through compelling characters and non-linear vignettes involving the spell food casts over humans. Part spaghetti Western (ramen Western?), part culinary erotica, part romantic comedy,  Tampopo  is boldly singular in its tone and technique. To help Tampopo’s floundering business, a ragtag group of men joins forces to gather the best ingredients and gastronomy to make Tampopo sell the superior ramen in town. The film is ultimately a very sweet study of the way we form close bonds and support one another, and one of my favorite features of the film is that it very intentionally shows men helping a woman they are not ostensibly sexually attracted to, or at least sexual attraction is not the basis of their kindness towards her. It is refreshing, even today, to see a film that depicts meaningful platonic relationships between men and women. Cancer, I hope that you enjoy Tampopo as much as I do, and can use it as an opportunity to think about your own chosen family and appreciate them for supporting you and caring for you, as you no doubt also do for them.

Cancer: Tampopo (1985) directed by Juzo Itami

Cancer, as the “mother sign” of the zodiac, family is a very central piece of your life. However, it’s 2018 and our concept of family has thankfully evolved from something very fixed to something more amorphous and inclusive. Many people now refer to their friends and mentors as their, “chosen family”, and for many folks, a chosen family is every bit as important, if not more important, than blood relatives. With the holidays coming up, a time that I know can be difficult for many without a healthy biological family dynamic, I chose a film for you that beautifully showcases the strength in a chosen family. Tampopo is an incredibly visually stimulating film telling the story of a down-on-her-luck ramen shop owner, Tampopo (Nobuko Miyamoto), through compelling characters and non-linear vignettes involving the spell food casts over humans. Part spaghetti Western (ramen Western?), part culinary erotica, part romantic comedy, Tampopo is boldly singular in its tone and technique. To help Tampopo’s floundering business, a ragtag group of men joins forces to gather the best ingredients and gastronomy to make Tampopo sell the superior ramen in town. The film is ultimately a very sweet study of the way we form close bonds and support one another, and one of my favorite features of the film is that it very intentionally shows men helping a woman they are not ostensibly sexually attracted to, or at least sexual attraction is not the basis of their kindness towards her. It is refreshing, even today, to see a film that depicts meaningful platonic relationships between men and women. Cancer, I hope that you enjoy Tampopo as much as I do, and can use it as an opportunity to think about your own chosen family and appreciate them for supporting you and caring for you, as you no doubt also do for them.


  Leo:     We Are the Best!     (2013) directed by Lukas Moodysson   Leo, as we all know, you love the spotlight. It is no surprise that many performers are Leos, or have significant Leo placements in their charts. However, you are also extremely prideful and can veer towards vanity if you aren’t careful. You may be holding yourself back from creative opportunities that would yield self-growth and fulfillment if you feel the circumstances aren’t absolutely perfect, Leo. So, naturally, this month I have chosen  We Are the Best!  for the Leo film! Adapted from the director’s wife Coco Moodysson’s graphic novel  Never Goodnight,   We Are the Best!  centers around three Swedish outcast adolescents who form a punk band despite having minimal musical knowledge. The girls, Bobo (Mira Barkhammar), Klara (Mira Grosin), and Hedvig (Liv LeMoyne), are constantly mocked by their peers, as well as male punk musicians for being perceived as too punk for the squares and too square for the punks. However, the girls are empowered by their band (also called We Are the Best!) and don’t let the haters get them down. The joy they get out of playing music together, for their own pleasure above all else, acts as a barricade against self-doubt and insecurity. Leo, I hope you watch this film and feel inspired to dive head-first into the creative project that’s been in the back of your mind.

Leo: We Are the Best! (2013) directed by Lukas Moodysson

Leo, as we all know, you love the spotlight. It is no surprise that many performers are Leos, or have significant Leo placements in their charts. However, you are also extremely prideful and can veer towards vanity if you aren’t careful. You may be holding yourself back from creative opportunities that would yield self-growth and fulfillment if you feel the circumstances aren’t absolutely perfect, Leo. So, naturally, this month I have chosen We Are the Best! for the Leo film! Adapted from the director’s wife Coco Moodysson’s graphic novel Never Goodnight, We Are the Best! centers around three Swedish outcast adolescents who form a punk band despite having minimal musical knowledge. The girls, Bobo (Mira Barkhammar), Klara (Mira Grosin), and Hedvig (Liv LeMoyne), are constantly mocked by their peers, as well as male punk musicians for being perceived as too punk for the squares and too square for the punks. However, the girls are empowered by their band (also called We Are the Best!) and don’t let the haters get them down. The joy they get out of playing music together, for their own pleasure above all else, acts as a barricade against self-doubt and insecurity. Leo, I hope you watch this film and feel inspired to dive head-first into the creative project that’s been in the back of your mind.


  Virgo:       Losing Ground     (1982) directed by Kathleen Collins   Virgo, you are a sign that loves being in control. You tend to be very well put together, often not letting onlookers see any emotional disturbances that lurk beneath your carefully curated exterior. One of the most Virgo characters I have ever seen is Sara Rogers (Seret Scott), the charismatic and at times confusing protagonist of Kathleen Collin’s visceral study of relationships and control,  Losing Ground . The first feature length film directed by an African American woman (!!!), Losing Ground is the story of Sara, a ridiculously smart and enticing philosophy professor, and her laid-back painter husband, Victor (Bill Gunn). It seems as though they are stuck in a rut in their relationship, or that maybe they have built their marriage on a nonexistent foundation. To mix things up, the couple decides to rent a house in upstate New York and escape the bustle of the city for the summer. While Victor ends up flirting with the young women of the idyllic town, Sara reluctantly accepts a role in her student’s film, in which she plays a woman very different from herself, and must sensually dance with and seduce another man, Duke (Duane Jones). Throughout the film, Sara grapples with the shortcomings of her marriage and question her behavior and the way she must be in control of every element of her life. This film is dreamy and daring, and I think you will gain a lot from it, Virgos! Take time to examine your own relationships as well as your relationship to yourself. Is there room anywhere for you to relinquish a little control in order to receive opportunities you could never plan?

Virgo: Losing Ground (1982) directed by Kathleen Collins

Virgo, you are a sign that loves being in control. You tend to be very well put together, often not letting onlookers see any emotional disturbances that lurk beneath your carefully curated exterior. One of the most Virgo characters I have ever seen is Sara Rogers (Seret Scott), the charismatic and at times confusing protagonist of Kathleen Collin’s visceral study of relationships and control, Losing Ground. The first feature length film directed by an African American woman (!!!), Losing Ground is the story of Sara, a ridiculously smart and enticing philosophy professor, and her laid-back painter husband, Victor (Bill Gunn). It seems as though they are stuck in a rut in their relationship, or that maybe they have built their marriage on a nonexistent foundation. To mix things up, the couple decides to rent a house in upstate New York and escape the bustle of the city for the summer. While Victor ends up flirting with the young women of the idyllic town, Sara reluctantly accepts a role in her student’s film, in which she plays a woman very different from herself, and must sensually dance with and seduce another man, Duke (Duane Jones). Throughout the film, Sara grapples with the shortcomings of her marriage and question her behavior and the way she must be in control of every element of her life. This film is dreamy and daring, and I think you will gain a lot from it, Virgos! Take time to examine your own relationships as well as your relationship to yourself. Is there room anywhere for you to relinquish a little control in order to receive opportunities you could never plan?


  Libra:    Beatriz at Dinner    (2017) directed by Miguel Artera   Libra, as your season comes to an end, you might be feeling particularly sensitive and vulnerable. I am going to push you to live in that state and go a little deeper. As I mentioned last month, Libras are caught in a flux of wanting justice above all else, but not wanting to cause confrontation and discomfort. It is a difficult balance to strike, and  Beatriz at Dinner  is an excellent examination on this very struggle. Starring the always phenomenal Salma Hayek as Beatriz, an intuitive and moralistic healer and massage therapist in Los Angeles, the film centers around an awkward dinner party that Beatriz is forced to attend due to her car breaking down outside a wealthy client’s house. It is obvious from the jump that the world of the wealthy clients, Kathy (Connie Britton) and Grant (David Warshovsky), and their guests, is painfully incongruous to that of Beatriz. What starts as awkwardness between Beatriz and the other guests, most noticeably development tycoon and shameless capitalist Doug Strutt (John Lithgow), quickly escalates into rage and violence based on class, race, and a fundamental difference in world-views and politics. As Beatriz becomes increasingly angry at the way these elite people are complicit in the destruction of the planet and the harm of marginalized people, she must decide how she will make a statement against their beliefs, or lack thereof. Libra, use this film as a tool to help you question your own method of stopping the injustices you see around you.

Libra: Beatriz at Dinner (2017) directed by Miguel Artera

Libra, as your season comes to an end, you might be feeling particularly sensitive and vulnerable. I am going to push you to live in that state and go a little deeper. As I mentioned last month, Libras are caught in a flux of wanting justice above all else, but not wanting to cause confrontation and discomfort. It is a difficult balance to strike, and Beatriz at Dinner is an excellent examination on this very struggle. Starring the always phenomenal Salma Hayek as Beatriz, an intuitive and moralistic healer and massage therapist in Los Angeles, the film centers around an awkward dinner party that Beatriz is forced to attend due to her car breaking down outside a wealthy client’s house. It is obvious from the jump that the world of the wealthy clients, Kathy (Connie Britton) and Grant (David Warshovsky), and their guests, is painfully incongruous to that of Beatriz. What starts as awkwardness between Beatriz and the other guests, most noticeably development tycoon and shameless capitalist Doug Strutt (John Lithgow), quickly escalates into rage and violence based on class, race, and a fundamental difference in world-views and politics. As Beatriz becomes increasingly angry at the way these elite people are complicit in the destruction of the planet and the harm of marginalized people, she must decide how she will make a statement against their beliefs, or lack thereof. Libra, use this film as a tool to help you question your own method of stopping the injustices you see around you.



Daisy Stackpole